Sunday, December 18, 2011

How to Write a Book in Four Easy Steps

1. First, choose appealing ingredients, including intriguing characters - I mean apples:



2. Next, peel away the skins and throw them all together and simmer for 15 drafts - I mean minutes:


3. Then, puree (edit in a blender), drain off the excess and reserve for another story - I mean drinking:


4. And there you have it - a book!  I mean - applesauce!



Oh well, I tried.  The analogy isn't perfect.  But what corresponds best, I think, is that if you begin with good ingredients, and have the patience to combine them and simmer them and drain off the excess, you are more likely to end with something good.  

Yes? No? Maybe?



23 comments:

  1. Love the old sportswriter Red Smith's explanation of the struggles of the writer. Someone commented once on his writing. "Writing must come easy to you."
    Red's retort, "Oh, yes, I just open a vein and bleed."

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  2. Very clever. Now to get someone to finally purchase my applesauce...

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  3. I love the analogy. I just wish that, since I do know how to make applesauce, I could really translate that into being a wonderful author like you! But, as a librarian, get to savor your work, and really enjoy that far more than eating applesauce. :)

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  4. Un vrai régal, combinaison de saveurs et d'écriture...
    gros bisous

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  5. Perfect images to accompany what seem to be 4 easy steps. They have not translated so simply for me in the book-writing process, but I keep thinking.

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  6. I think this is a great analogy! I really loved Unfinished Angel, by the way. I read it in one night! :)

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  7. Remember to sprinkle cinnamon on top! It all works.

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  8. I also think this works as an analogy for writing. Now I just need to do it. I need to sit down and write. I need to pour the thoughts out, so that I can drain off the excess.

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  9. love your applesauce. I mean books.

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  10. I believe that you make it sound easier than it is, and you left out the hard part about planting the seed, tending the tree, and harvesting the apples.

    Bises,
    Genie

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  11. yumm, isn't that a tasty dish to set before a king... or queen...or princess...or prince?

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  12. Genie, yes, you are right, of course.

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  13. You are the expert here. I wish it was as easy as making applesauce. It is hard for me. Mine were almost always for some college bookstore, many years ago.

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  14. Amazing recipe, and so creative and cool analogy.You are very talented!
    Léia

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  15. I like the analogy. (Plus I just like books and homemade applesauce so much that anything correlating the two of them has to be good!) Patience is so important!

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  16. I'll try to remember this good (I mean delicious) lesson!

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  17. I love the analogy Sharon. It's inspiring too.

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  18. Lovely results but I am drawn to the third photo. I want a bottle of that. . . a Sharon Creech "book in a bottle." Ideas abound.

    Merry Christmas to you.

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  19. Happy New Year dear friend
    Love to your heart!
    Léia & Cezar

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  20. Hm. Do you add water when you simmer? I had never thought of draining the apples; I just blend them all together after simmering. But that bottle of apple elixir looks so tempting...

    I neglect your analogy, since I am a blender (editor) myself and have never tried to make my own applesauce - I merely try to improve the applesauces of others.

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  21. Amy B: yes, I add water, and the 'elixir' is SO good, and I am so grateful there are 'blenders' to improve our applesauces.

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  22. I saw this post the other day and meant to leave a comment and something happened - I clicked, something went wrong but your analogy stayed with me all day - it's still here. Perhaps I wish it was as easy as making applesauce...I fear not. But yes, the ingredients are just the same. Love this post, Sharon.

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